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Reading comprehension 2014 - Slang




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                                               READING COMPREHENSION
 
Read the text and then choose the best option: 
 
                                                                        Glitter Text Generator

Language changes all the time. New words and phrases appear and evolve. The words and pronunciations used by young people in UK can be very different to those used by adults. Living in multicultural society has an effect on language, especially on young people, whose friends are often from a mix of backgrounds. TV and music also have a big impact on the language of the young. Often UK singers sing in American accents without realising.

Young British people use a lot of language that you usually can’t find in most dictionaries. These extremely informal words and expressions are known as “slang”. It is not possible to make a complete list of modern British  slang. By the time you finished the list, it would be out of date! New words come and go like fashions.

                                                                         
 

Professor Kerswill, a professor of linguistics at Lancaster University, said: “Young people try to make themselves stand out from younger children and parents and to some extent they are trying to create a code which teachers can’t break. Words are contagious. They can be spread by music and Facebook and TV. ” He has been researching a multi-ethnic accent which has grown up in inner city London and he added. “This accent, and probably the slang too started in poorer urban areas but has been taken on by kids in wealthier parts of the country.” But he said despite some examples like this there was also a lot of “regional development”.

Not everybody uses slang and not everybody likes it. A school in Sheffield, in the north of England, recently instructed its pupils to stop using slang words such as hiya (hello), cheers and ta (both mean thank you). The head teacher says that if young people learn to speak ‘correctly’ this will help them get a place at university and a good job.

When British people use language like this, it’s no surprise that some students say they can’t understand native speakers. But perhaps learners don’t need to worry about communicating with native speakers so much. Research shows that most of the English spoken in the world today is spoken between non-native speakers of the language.  In fact, when we think about ‘International English’, there is no such thing as native or non-native speakers.

So, how important is it to understand these slang words and expressions? If you watch films or TV in English, read magazines in English, chat online in English or are interested in English song lyrics then understanding slang can be very useful. You probably won’t see much slang in your English exam though.

 

 Now  decide if the sentences are true, false or the text doesn't say:

1.     The sentence structures that young people use in the UK differ a lot from what adults use.

                      true                                       false                             doesn't say

 

2. 2.  Sometimes British singers don’t notice that they sound like Americans.

                           true                                       false                             doesn't say

 

3. 3.  Experts have made a complete list of modern British slang, but it is out of date now.

                          true                                       false                             doesn't say
 

4. 4. Young people want to create a language that adults can’t understand.

                     true                                       false                             doesn't say

 

5.  5. A head teacher in the north of England thinks using slang can prevent pupils achieving their goals.

                         true                                       false                             doesn't say

 

6.  6Nowadays, most people in the world mainly speak English with people whose mother tongue is English.

                    true                                       false                             doesn't say

 

7. 7 There are quite a few examples of slang words in English exams.

                    true                                       false                             doesn't say

 

8. 8.You won’t be able to understand films, TV programmes or songs in English if you don’t understand British slang.

                   true                                       false                             doesn't say